Maastricht’s notable time dimension

While visiting Maastricht one does not need to wear a watch. There are clocks everywhere and one can read the time either from a street clock or from the clocks decorating a number of old buildings. The clocks work well, so there is no reasons to be late or to ignore the time dimension, which is essential in the Netherlands.

Maastricht’s time stamps are visible in each corner of the city. As a time dimension sign, Maastricht is one-of-a-kind place enriched with beautiful street clocks and old buildings holding clocks of all colours and from different ages of history.

Street clock Maastricht

Street clock in Maastricht

Some of the city’s secular buildings are designed in Gothic style while many others are genuine pieces of Baroque, Romanesque and Renaissance architecture.

Maastricht Town Hall

 

Built in the 17th century by Pieter Post, the Maastricht Town Hall is a relevant example of the Dutch Baroque architecture. The building has got a beautiful hexagonal façade clock tower.

Het Dinghuis

 

This is a medieval courthouse, which was built in Gothic style around 1470. On top of it there is a tower with a silhouette visible from many corners of the city. On the main façade there is an impressive clock with only one hand. The clock bell still works today. Nowadays the building houses the Maastricht Tourist Office.

Sint-Janskerk

 

Sint-Janskerk or St. John Church is one of the most iconic buildings in the centre of Maastricht. The building tower houses a beautiful clock in four faces, so anyone can check the time from any angle. The clock bell bears the name of “gate clock”.

Maastricht Railway station

 

The station brick building was built in 1913. On its main façade George Willem van Heukelom, the designer, placed a beautiful clock.

Theater Aan Het Vrijthof in Vrijthof Square

 

This building serves as a playhouse and is located on one side of Vrijthof, the city main square. The house can accommodate about 850 people in the main room. There is no clock on the building, but the one of the Sint-Janskerk tower is very visible.

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